DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203A
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester
DC Nichole Jelinek
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Programs

  • Computer Science JM&C
  • Center for the Mathematics of Uncertainty CMU.
  • Research Design and Analysis RDA
  • North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society NAFIPS
  • Various Programs I have written are available by selecting the Programs Tab (On fuzzy.creighton.edu).

Downloads

 

 

Introduction to Scientific Thinking

We will basically follow the same schedule as section A.

Schedule at http://dave-reed.com/csc121/

CourseCSC121CallNumber73698
TermFall 2011SectionB
Time12:30-13:45Days T H
Final2011-12-15At10:00

Description

This course introduces students to science and scientific reasoning from a perspective that integrates computer science and the natural sciences. Students will gain a basic understanding of computer technology (its organization, history, societal impact, etc.) and how computers are used in various scientific disciplines. In particular, the use of the scientific method and the importance of computer modeling in scientific inquiry will be studied. Students will learn to develop simple Web-based programs for analyzing data and modeling systems, and use those programs in conducting hands-on experiments. Applications in biology, chemistry, and physics will provide insights into how these disciplines approach problems and utilize computers and computer modeling as tools.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To learn the fundamental concepts underlying computer technology and appreciate the computer's impact on science and society.
  • To understand and practice the scientific method as a technique for studying natural and artificial phenomena.
  • To develop problem-solving skills through the process of designing, implementing, and experimenting with Web-based computer programs.
  • To develop critical-thinking skills by conducting experiments and analyzing the data obtained by observing natural phenomena and also by simulating complex systems on a computer.
  • To experience the interdisciplinary nature of computing and appreciate how the different scientific disciplines approach problems and utilize computers as tools.

Course Organization:

Required Work 

Class periods will consist of two types of activity. For discussion days, students will be assigned readings and must answer review questions via email before the discussion day. Attendance and participation in class discussions of the assigned material is expected of all students. Practical experience in developing Web-based programs and using them to conduct experiments will be obtained through chapter exercises. Students will be assigned exercises and will work on the computer with the assistance of the instructor.

Interspersed throughout the course will be 5 lab assignments, which involve using computers as tools to solve problems from the sciences. In addition to some programming, lab assignments generally involve the observation of natural systems or simulations, data collection and analysis, and a written summary of your findings.

In addition, there will be two 75-minute tests and a cumulative 100-minute final exam.

chapter exercises 20 %
lab assignments 15 %
review questions/discussions 10 %
two 75-minute tests 30 %
100-minute final exam 25 %

The final course grade will be based on the above weightings. At the minimum, the following cutoffs will apply: A (90-100%), B+ (86-89%), B (80-85%), C+ (76-79%), C (70-75%), D (60-70%), and F (0-59%). Some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If a student must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is their responsibility to make up missed work. Assignments and tests will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances. Unexcused absences will directly impact the student's grade on discussion days (resulting in a 0 for the missed day), and it is expected that excessive absences will leave the student unprepared for tests and assignments. If a class must be cancelled by the instructor for some reason, notification will be sent to students via email.

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Policy on Collaboration

In addition to the college policy on cheating and plagiarism as spelled out in the Student Handbook www2.creighton.edu/fileadmin/user/CCAS/docs/acadhonesty.html.the following guidelines hold for this course.
  • For chapter exercises, you are encouraged to talk with your classmates and assist each other in completing the lessons. All answers and code submitted by you must be your own work, however. Thus, sharing answers or copying code is expressly forbidden.
  • For lab assignments, you may collaborate with one other student in the class. You must identify that person on the submitted assignment, and may not collaborate with the same person more than once. As with exercises, the actual answers and code submitted must be your own work.
  • Since the point of the review questions on reading assignments is to ascertain what you found interesting or confusing in the readings, no collaboration is allowed on the review questions.
  • All tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including failure in the course.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Object Oriented Design

WEEK OF MATERIAL BOOK HOMEWORK
Aug 22, 2011 Introduction    
Aug 29, 2011 Java    
Sep 05, 2011 Finding Objects   Prison
Sep 12, 2011 Classes   Quiz 1 (Java)
Sep 19, 2011 GAs   Class Diagram 1
Sep 26, 2011 Identifying Responsibilities   Class Digram 2&3
Oct 03, 2011 Specifying Static Behavior    
Oct 10, 2011 Dynamic Behavior    
Oct 17, 2011 FALL BREAK   FALL BREAK
Oct 24, 2011 Identifying Relationships    
Oct 31, 2011 Rules    
Nov 07, 2011 The Model    
Nov 14, 2011 Design    
Nov 21, 2011 Presentations    
Nov 28, 2011 Implementing Class    
Dec 05, 2011 Implementing Class    
Dec 12, 2011 Final & Projects Due   Finals Week
CourseCSC548CallNumber73455
TermFall 2011Section1
Time15:30-16:45Days M W
Final2011-12-13At10:00

Description

CSC 548 is concerned with modern software design. Large projects require a coordinated effort from multiple programmers. To successfully complete a large scale project using an Obeject-Oriented programming language the student needs to understand the subjects in the following outline

Requirement Analysis

  • Actors
  • Use case

Static Model

  • Object
  • Class
  • Information hiding
  • Encapsulation
  • Inheritance
  • Polymorphism
  • Late binding
  • Method overriding

Dynamic Model

  • State
  • Transition
  • Event
  • Action
  • Activity
  • Mealy machine
  • Moore machine

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program large projects require cooperation and planning. Developing a software plan is one of the main goals of this class, as is the ability to coordinate and work with others.

Modern software is most often designed using an object oriented paradigm. We will delve into Object Oriented Design, OOD, its Java imlementation, and the use of the version cntrol system GIT.

Grades based on
One Test 20 %
Midterm 75-minute test 20 %
In class projects 20 %
Three-Four programming assignments 20 %
Final Project 20 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library.

Software Engineering: A Hands-On Approach

  • Author: Robert Y. Lee
  • ISBN-13 eBook: 978-94-6239-006-5

    Library of Congress Control Nu

O-O ADI

Web Programming

 
WD Date Subject Book Homework
Thu 8/25/2011 Introduction    
Tue 8/30/2011 HTML    
Thu 9/01/2011 CSS Ch. 1 mjw53172
Tue 9/06/2011 Java Ch. 2  
Thu 9/08/2011 Script Ch. 3  
Tue 9/13/2011 LAMP Ch. 4  
Thu 9/15/2011 PHP - Basics    
Tue 9/20/2011 PHP - Basics 2 Ch. 5 Quiz One
Thu 9/22/2011 PHP - CSS   e-penguin
Tue 9/27/2011 PHP - Includes Ch. 6
Thu 9/29/2011 PHP - $_POST   WorkSheet 1
Tue 10/04/2011 PHP -Forms Ch. 7
Thu 10/06/2011 PHP - Uploading    
Tue 10/11/2011 PHP - Files Ch. 8  
Thu 10/13/2011 Midterm    
Tue 10/18/2011 FALL    
Thu 10/20/2011 BREAK    
Tue 10/25/2011 Database Ch. 11
Thu 10/27/2011 MySQL  
Tue 11/01/2011 Sessions    
Thu 11/03/2011 Logins  
Tue 11/08/2011 Java-Split    
Thu 11/10/2011 PHP-Explode    
Tue 11/15/2011 SQL Ch. 12  
Thu 11/17/2011 Javascript    
Tue 11/22/2011 Help Session (takehome)  
Thu 11/24/2011 THANKSGIVING    
Tue 11/29/2011 Review Ch. 13  
Thu 12/01/2011 Test 3    
Tue 12/06/2011 Bugs Ch. 14  
Thu 12/08/2011 Security Ch 15  
Tue 12/13/2011 FINAL PROJECT Due

10:00AM

BLOG
CourseCSC551CallNumber71645
TermFall 2011Section1
Time15:30-16:45Days T H
Final2011-12-15At13:00

Description

In the beginning there was the WorldWideWeb a browser written by Tim Berners-Lee (1990).  It allowed people to exchange documents and information over the internet using a markup language called HTML.

To say that this has changed the world is simply a statement of fact. But as soon as you invent something, people will say, "If only it could ..."

To make the WWW do more, needed the addition of code to HTML.

So this class will look at HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and SQL.

These languages will be studied on a  system called LAMP. LAMP is
Linux
Apache
mySQL, &
PHP

This course will focus on the last element but will introduce and use the other technologies to illustrate the orchestration of a modern interactive website.

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be six quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Java program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be accepted up to 14 days after their due date, with a 1pt a day penalty for the first week, and a 2pt a day penalty for the second week.

Grades based on %
Four quizzes 20 %
Five-six programming assignments 50 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
Final Project 10 %

 

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library.

PHP Solutions
3rd Edition

  • David Power
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 3 edition (December 5, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1484206363
UML

Penguin is 147.134.125.88

MS Software for JM&C People

PHP main website contains a PHP Manual

Database http://www.industrex.com/dynamic/database/

Lots of help, tutorials and manual on all things W3: http://www.w3schools.com/default.asp

MySQL/MariaSQL connection code

  • Python download platform independant source and install on command line using python3 setup.py install.
  • Java you have to add the jar to the build path

Mac

PC

 

Computer Applications

Week R Book Code UsingR Code LyX Homework Due
1 Intro     Intro  
2 LyX and Data     Documents  
3 Univariate     Conversion  
4 Bivariate VerzaniBookCh03   Text  
5 Mulivariate - df VerzaniBookCh04_df Graphs Lists  
6 Multivariate - Plots VerzaniBookCh04_plot   Tables  
7 Test   V3 Floats  
8 FALL BREAK     Break  
9 Stats   V4 Math  
10 Distributions   V5 Math 2  
11 Graphs 2   V6 Index  
12 Logic   V7 Bbiliography  
13 Functions Repeate V9 Books  
14 Graphs-Lattice   V8 Beamer  
15 Models   V9 LaTeX  
16 Conclusion     Conclusion  
17 Final is YOUR Presentations     TBA Paper #1
CourseRDA525CallNumber72686
TermFall 2011SectionN
Time18:00-20:30Days W
Final2011-12-14At18:00

Description

RDA525 comprises an introduction to two open source technologies often used in producing scholarly publications.

The first is LyX, a multi-platform document processor. LyX software can be used to write complicated documents. LyX is a front end to TeX, a typesetting system that produces superior output. LyXis based on a "What You See Is What You Mean" paradigm rather than a "What You See Is What You Get" (MSWord) paradigm. LyX also allows for the inclusion of complex mathematical formulas and elegantly formatted tables.

R is a computer language dedicaded to statistical computing and graphics. R is in wide use in the field of data analysis. Many packages are written for R to perform sophisticated procedures, such as the text mining. It is widely used by researchers in political science.

Organization

There will be a homework assignment every week. There will be a midterm and a final paper.

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER PERCENT
Midterm 1 20%
Final Presentation 1 10%
Quizes 2 10%
Paper 1 10%
Homework 10 50%

Class Cancellation Policy:

I will email you, the Admin almost always knows what is going on. I may even update the website.

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Verzani

Using R for Introductory Statistics by John Verzani
Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC; 1 edition (November 29, 2004)
ISBN-13: 978-1584884507

R

LyX

  • LyX | LyX – The Document Processor
    An open source document processor running on many Unix platforms (including MacOS X), OS/2, and under Windows/Cygwin. LyX produces output using LaTeX in the ...
    www.lyx.org
  • JabREF Download Help
  • Mac Templates Plus

LaTeX

  • MacTeX - TeX Users Group
    Apr 6, 2009 ... An easy-to-install open source TeX distribution for MacOSX. It is essentially gwTeX plus XeTeX, with a simple GUI installer and a few extra ...
    www.tug.org/mactex
  • TeX Live - TeX Users Group
    Apr 21, 2009 ... A TeX CD compiled by the TeX Users Groups. Contains ready-to-run TeX systems for most types of Unix, Mac OSX, and Windows, ...
    www.tug.org/texlive/
  • JabREF A java GUI for BIBTEX
  •  
  • Install

    TeX first!

  • Change A4 to Letter!
    texlive
  • LyX Next

  • Don't Install MikTeX! My guess TexLive is at C:\texlive\2012\bin\win32.
  • LyX

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
2500 California Plaza | Omaha NE | 68178 | 402.280.1782
Copyright © 2015 Creighton University JM&C