DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
11:00   Research Seminar
11:00 -12:15
   
       
       
       
12:00      
         
    Intro To Sci Think
CSC121-2
72924
12:30-13:45
CA204
  Intro To Sci Think
CSC121-2
72924
12:30-13:45
CA204
     
13:00 Office Hours
By
Appointment
Only
 
   
   
       
14:00 Office Hours
140:0 -15:15
CA203B
x1782
Office Hours
14:00 -16:45
CA203B
x1782
Office Hours
14:00 -15:15
CA203B
x1782
 
 
 
15:00
     
  Mobile App
CSC581-1
73426
15:30-16:45
CA207
Mobile App
CSC581-1
73426
15:30-16:45
CA207
 
16:00
 
 
         
17:00        
         
         
         
18:00     CompApps
RDA525-N
72236
18:00-20:30
CA204
 
       
       
       
       
Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203B
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester Fall 2012
DC Sandra Drummond
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Recent Publications

Books

  1. Michael B. Gibilisco, Annie M. Gowen, Karen E. Albert, John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, and Alex Pham. Fuzzy Social Choice Theory. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
  2. John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, Alex Pham, and Michael A. Redmond. Linear Models in the Mathematics of Uncertainty. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

 

Chapters

  1. Eric N. Fischer, Ciprianna M. Dudding, Tyler J. Engel, Matthew A. Reynolds, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Explaining variation in state involvement in cyber attacks: A social network approach. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 63—74. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  2. Morgan L. Eichman, James A. Rolfsen, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Morde- son, and Terry D. Clark. The global spread of islamism: An agent-based computer model. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 407—426. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  3. Mark J. Wierman. Syzygy. In Rudolf Seising, Enric Trillas, Claudio Moraga, and Settimo Termini, editors, On Fuzziness: A Homage to Lotfi A. Zadeh, volume 2, pages 327—334. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

Journal Articles

  1. Peter Colum Casey, Mark J. Wierman, Michael B. Gibilisco, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Assessing policy stability in iraq: a fuzzy approach to modeling preferences. Public Choice, 151:409-423, 2012.
  2. William J. Tastle, J. Russell, and Mark J. Wierman. A new measure to analyze student performance using the likert scale. Information Systems Education Journal, 6(35), 2008.
  3. Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, Adam Karnik, Jacob Moore, and Mark J. Wierman. Determining the causes of democratic consolidation: A consideration of several fuzzy methods. New Mathematics and Natural Computation, 5:353—369, 2009.

Conference Papers

  1. Mark J. Wierman. Psychologists: Are they logically fuzzy? In IFSA/NAFIPS, 2013, pages 854—859, June 2013.
  2. Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, and William .J. Tastle. A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. In NAFIPS, 2012, pages 1-6, August 2012.
  3. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Multidimensional dissention. In NAFIPS 2011, pages 117-122. El Paso, TX, 2011. ISBN 978-1-61284-967-6.
  4. Mark J. Wierman. Cloud sets as a measure theoretic basis for fuzzy set theory. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.
  5. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Measurement theory and subsethood. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.

 

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Computers and Scientific Thinking

We will basically follow the same schedule as section A.

Note that the Final Time for Section B is Thursday at 10AM.

Schedule at http://dave-reed.com/csc121/

CourseCSC121CallNumber72924
TermFall 2012SectionB
Time12:30-13:45DaysT H
Final2012-12-15At11:11

Description

This course introduces students to science and scientific reasoning from a perspective that integrates computer science and the natural sciences. Students will gain a basic understanding of computer technology (its organization, history, societal impact, etc.) and how computers are used in various scientific disciplines. In particular, the use of the scientific method and the importance of computer modeling in scientific inquiry will be studied. Students will learn to develop simple Web-based programs for analyzing data and modeling systems, and use those programs in conducting hands-on experiments. Applications in biology, chemistry, and physics will provide insights into how these disciplines approach problems and utilize computers and computer modeling as tools.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To learn the fundamental concepts underlying computer technology and appreciate the computer's impact on science and society.
  • To understand and practice the scientific method as a technique for studying natural and artificial phenomena.
  • To develop problem-solving skills through the process of designing, implementing, and experimenting with Web-based computer programs.
  • To develop critical-thinking skills by conducting experiments and analyzing the data obtained by observing natural phenomena and also by simulating complex systems on a computer.
  • To experience the interdisciplinary nature of computing and appreciate how the different scientific disciplines approach problems and utilize computers as tools.

Course Organization:

Required Work 

Class periods will consist of two types of activity. For discussion days, students will be assigned readings and must answer review questions via email before the discussion day. Attendance and participation in class discussions of the assigned material is expected of all students. Practical experience in developing Web-based programs and using them to conduct experiments will be obtained through chapter exercises. Students will be assigned exercises and will work on the computer with the assistance of the instructor.

Interspersed throughout the course will be 5 lab assignments, which involve using computers as tools to solve problems from the sciences. In addition to some programming, lab assignments generally involve the observation of natural systems or simulations, data collection and analysis, and a written summary of your findings.

In addition, there will be two 75-minute tests and a cumulative 100-minute final exam.

chapter exercises 20 %
lab assignments 15 %
review questions/discussions 10 %
two 75-minute tests 30 %
100-minute final exam 25 %

The final course grade will be based on the above weightings. At the minimum, the following cutoffs will apply: A (90-100%), B+ (86-89%), B (80-85%), C+ (76-79%), C (70-75%), D (60-70%), and F (0-59%). Some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If a student must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is their responsibility to make up missed work. Assignments and tests will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances. Unexcused absences will directly impact the student's grade on discussion days (resulting in a 0 for the missed day), and it is expected that excessive absences will leave the student unprepared for tests and assignments. If a class must be cancelled by the instructor for some reason, notification will be sent to students via email.

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Policy on Collaboration

In addition to the college policy on cheating and plagiarism as spelled out in the Student Handbook www2.creighton.edu/fileadmin/user/CCAS/docs/acadhonesty.html.the following guidelines hold for this course.
  • For chapter exercises, you are encouraged to talk with your classmates and assist each other in completing the lessons. All answers and code submitted by you must be your own work, however. Thus, sharing answers or copying code is expressly forbidden.
  • For lab assignments, you may collaborate with one other student in the class. You must identify that person on the submitted assignment, and may not collaborate with the same person more than once. As with exercises, the actual answers and code submitted must be your own work.
  • Since the point of the review questions on reading assignments is to ascertain what you found interesting or confusing in the readings, no collaboration is allowed on the review questions.
  • All tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including failure in the course.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Mobile App Development

Date Subject Book Work Due
Aug 23, 2012 App    
Aug 28, 2012 XCode 3  
Aug 30, 2012 NIB    
Sep 04, 2012 Objective-C    
Sep 06, 2012      
Sep 11, 2012 Interaction   Quiz
Sep 13, 2012      
Sep 18, 2012 More Interaction   App 1
Sep 20, 2012      
Sep 25, 2012 View    
Sep 27, 2012      
Oct 02, 2012 AppSet AppSet2  
Oct 04, 2012      
Oct 09, 2012 Review    
Oct 11, 2012 MidTerm    
Oct 16, 2012 BREAK    
Oct 18, 2012 BREAK    
Oct 23, 2012 Utility    
Oct 25, 2012 Data    
Oct 30, 2012 Persistence    
Nov 01, 2012 Date Pickers    
Nov 06, 2012 Pickers    
Nov 08, 2012 Touch    
Nov 13, 2012 Apps    
Nov 15, 2012 TableView    
Nov 20, 2012 Prototypes    
Nov 22, 2012 Thanksgiving    
Nov 27, 2012 Teams    
Nov 29, 2012      
Dec 04, 2012      
Dec 06, 2012    
CourseCSC581CallNumber73426
TermFall 2012Section1
Time15:50-16:45Days T H
Final2012-12-15At11:11

Description

This class covers the basics of iPhone App development.

Objectives

The purpose of programming is to make the computer do what you want it to. The goal of this course is to take the student over the hurdles of Swift and XCode so that they an build the App of their dreams.

Course Organization

The first half of the class will present the first seven chapters of the textbook in detail. This will include the basics of the Swift programming language and how the XCode IDE functions. The second half will focus on the Student's Apps and the technologies needed to achieve full functionality.

There will be a two Tests and a Midterm. It will cover the material from the previous week's lecture(s), the appropriate chapters of the book, and any lessons you should have learned while you were doing your projects. The final will be your iPhone App.

Assignments

Assignments will be collected at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Anything turned in after the assignment has been collected is considered late.

I do not believe in arriving late to class, finishing homework in class, printing materials after class, or handing it in "later" and receiving full credit. Late assignments will not receive full credit.

Grades based on
Three Quizzes 25 %
Five-six programming assignments 25 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 25 %
Final App 25 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

iOS

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library

Beginning iPhone Development with Swift 2

Beginning iPhone Development with Swift 2 Exploring the iOS 9 SDK

  • By David Mark , Jack Nutting , Kim Topley , Fredrik Olsson , Jeff LaMarche
  • ISBN13: 978-1-484217-53-5
  • 880 Pages
  • User Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Publication Date: December 23, 2015
  • Available eBook Formats: EPUB, MOBI, PDF

Computer Applications

Week R Book Code UsingR Code LyX Homework Due
1 Intro and Data     Intro  
2 Univariate UsingR.Ch2     HW.Ch2
3 Bivariate UsingR.Ch3     HW.Ch3
4 LyX & Multivariate     Documents  
5 Mulivariate - df UsingR.Ch4      
6 Multivariate - Plots       HW.Ch4A
7 Test UsingR.Ch5   Bbiliography  
8 FALL BREAK        
9 Distributions UsingR.Ch6      
10 Simulations Queue   FSRFA13  
11 Confidence Intervals UsingR.Ch7      
12 Hypothesis Testing UsingR.Ch8      
13 Thanksgiving     Red.zip Research Prop
14 Regression        
15 Sweave        
17 Final is YOUR Presentations     TBA Paper #1
CourseRDA525CallNumber00000
TermFall 2012SectionN
Time18:00-21:00Days W
Final2012-12-15At11:11

Description

RDA525 comprises an introduction to two open source technologies often used in producing scholarly publications.

The first is LyX, a multi-platform document processor. LyX software can be used to write complicated documents. LyX is a front end to TeX, a typesetting system that produces superior output. LyXis based on a "What You See Is What You Mean" paradigm rather than a "What You See Is What You Get" (MSWord) paradigm. LyX also allows for the inclusion of complex mathematical formulas and elegantly formatted tables.

R is a computer language dedicaded to statistical computing and graphics. R is in wide use in the field of data analysis. Many packages are written for R to perform sophisticated procedures, such as the text mining. It is widely used by researchers in political science.

Organization

There will be a homework assignment every week. There will be a midterm and a final paper.

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER PERCENT
Midterm 1 20%
Final Presentation 1 10%
Quizes 2 10%
Paper 1 10%
Homework 10 50%

Class Cancellation Policy:

I will email you, the Admin almost always knows what is going on. I may even update the website.

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Verzani

Using R for Introductory Statistics by John Verzani
Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC; 1 edition (November 29, 2004)
ISBN-13: 978-1584884507

R

LyX

  • LyX | LyX – The Document Processor
    An open source document processor running on many Unix platforms (including MacOS X), OS/2, and under Windows/Cygwin. LyX produces output using LaTeX in the ...
    www.lyx.org
  • JabREF Download Help
  • Mac Templates Plus

LaTeX

  • MacTeX - TeX Users Group
    Apr 6, 2009 ... An easy-to-install open source TeX distribution for MacOSX. It is essentially gwTeX plus XeTeX, with a simple GUI installer and a few extra ...
    www.tug.org/mactex
  • TeX Live - TeX Users Group
    Apr 21, 2009 ... A TeX CD compiled by the TeX Users Groups. Contains ready-to-run TeX systems for most types of Unix, Mac OSX, and Windows, ...
    www.tug.org/texlive/
  • JabREF A java GUI for BIBTEX
  •  
  • Install

    TeX first!

  • Change A4 to Letter!
    texlive
  • LyX Next

  • Don't Install MikTeX! My guess TexLive is at C:\texlive\2012\bin\win32.
  • LyX

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
2500 California Plaza | Omaha NE | 68178 | 402.280.1782
Copyright © 2015 Creighton University JM&C