DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

 
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
11:00
Software
CSC 548
EPLY 110
Mobile
CSC 581
EPLY 110
Software
CSC 548
EPLY 110
Mobile
CSC 581
EPLY 110
12:30
Office Hours
x1782
CA203B
Office Hours
x1782
CA203B
Office Hours
x1782
CA203B
Office Hours
x1782
CA203B
14:00
JAVA
CSC 222
EPLY 110
JAVA
CSC 222
EPLY 110
Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203B
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester Fall 2016
DC Sandra Drummond
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Recent Publications

Books

  1. Michael B. Gibilisco, Annie M. Gowen, Karen E. Albert, John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, and Alex Pham. Fuzzy Social Choice Theory. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
  2. John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, Alex Pham, and Michael A. Redmond. Linear Models in the Mathematics of Uncertainty. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

 

Chapters

  1. Eric N. Fischer, Ciprianna M. Dudding, Tyler J. Engel, Matthew A. Reynolds, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Explaining variation in state involvement in cyber attacks: A social network approach. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 63—74. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  2. Morgan L. Eichman, James A. Rolfsen, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Morde- son, and Terry D. Clark. The global spread of islamism: An agent-based computer model. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 407—426. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  3. Mark J. Wierman. Syzygy. In Rudolf Seising, Enric Trillas, Claudio Moraga, and Settimo Termini, editors, On Fuzziness: A Homage to Lotfi A. Zadeh, volume 2, pages 327—334. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

Journal Articles

  1. Peter Colum Casey, Mark J. Wierman, Michael B. Gibilisco, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Assessing policy stability in iraq: a fuzzy approach to modeling preferences. Public Choice, 151:409-423, 2012.
  2. William J. Tastle, J. Russell, and Mark J. Wierman. A new measure to analyze student performance using the likert scale. Information Systems Education Journal, 6(35), 2008.
  3. Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, Adam Karnik, Jacob Moore, and Mark J. Wierman. Determining the causes of democratic consolidation: A consideration of several fuzzy methods. New Mathematics and Natural Computation, 5:353—369, 2009.

Conference Papers

  1. Mark J. Wierman. Psychologists: Are they logically fuzzy? In IFSA/NAFIPS, 2013, pages 854—859, June 2013.
  2. Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, and William .J. Tastle. A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. In NAFIPS, 2012, pages 1-6, August 2012.
  3. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Multidimensional dissention. In NAFIPS 2011, pages 117-122. El Paso, TX, 2011. ISBN 978-1-61284-967-6.
  4. Mark J. Wierman. Cloud sets as a measure theoretic basis for fuzzy set theory. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.
  5. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Measurement theory and subsethood. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.

 

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Object-Oriented Programming

Week Subject Book Work Due
0 Java    
1 IO & Vars 2 Eclipse
  Vars & Ops 2  
2 Loops 3 Inch2CM
  Branches 3  
3 Methods 4 Quiz 1
  Objects & Methods 4  
4 Classes 5 Kitchen Cost
  Die 5  
5 Inheritance 5 Quiz 2
  Interface 5 Guessing Game
6 Array 7 Appliances
  ArrayList 7  
7 Review    
  MidTerm    
8 FALL    
  BREAK    
9 Bugs/Try 8  
  Recursion 8  
10 Search & Sort 9  
  NAFIPS 9 Quiz 3
11 Generics 10  
  Maps 10 Wumpus
12 GUI 6  
  Events 6 Quiz 4
13 Components 13  
  Handmade 12 Wumpus GUI
14 Sockets 12  
  Threads 12 Contacts
15 Review    
  Thanks/Eval    
CourseCSC222CallNumber71503
TermFall 2016Section1
Time14:00-15:15DaysM W
Final2016-12-16At10:00

Description

This course, together with CSC 221, forms an introduction to problem-solving and programming. Building upon CSC 221, this course focuses on the design and analysis of larger, more complex programs. The process of breaking down a complex problem into manageable pieces and building a working system will be stressed throughout. Since part of this process is choosing the appropriate algorithm to solve the problem at hand, we will investigate the design and analysis of some standard and useful algorithms. Similarly, we will consider various ways of structuring and transforming information so as to make it efficiently accessible and manageable.

Specific topics covered in the course will include: GUI programming and data structures (e.g., vectors, pointers, classes), defining and using abstract data types (e.g., lists, stacks, queues), static vs. dynamic implementations of data structures, and recursion as an alternative to iteration. The structures and concepts covered in this class will be a starting point for further development in subsequent computer science courses.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To know and be able to use basic programming tools for object-oriented problem solving (e.g., classes, encapsulation, data hiding, and templates).
  • To appreciate the role of algorithms and data structures in problem solving and software design, recognizing that a given problem might be solved with a variety of algorithms and structures (e.g., object-oriented design, searching and sorting, recursion, stacks, queues, and linked lists).
  • To be able to design and implement a program to model a real-world system, and subsequently analyze its behavior.
  • To develop programming skills that can serve as a foundation for further study in computer science.

 

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be four quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Java program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be accepted up to 14 days after their due date, with a 1pt a day penalty for the first week, and a 2pt a day penalty for the second week.

Grades based on
Four quizzes 20 %
In class projects 10 %
Six programming assignments 30 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
One 100-minute final exam 20 %

 

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Objects First

JavaNotes, 7th edition

David J. Eck

Note the pdf download links at the bottom.

Local JavaNotes7

Sometimes you have to edit the latest setting list on the mac to make things work right. The file I edited was "/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_25.jdk/Contents/Info.plist" but you version may differ. The relevant section is


<key>JVMCapabilities</key>
<array>
<string>JNI</string>
<string>BundledApp</string>
<string>WebStart</string>
<string>Applets</string>
<string>CommandLine</string>
</array>

Software Engineering

Week Subject Book HomeWork
0 Introduction 1 git clone http://gitlab.creighton.edu/CSC548/reed.git
1 OO 2 Pick a Game
2 Relationships 3 Wumpii
3 Java 4 Play the game
4 Patterns 5 Quiz 1 (Java)
5 Requirements 6 Wumpii GUI
6 UML 6 Requirements
7 Dynamic Behavior Midterm Teams
8 FALL BREAK   FALL BREAK
9 Design 7 Use case Diagram
10 OO Revisited 8 Class Diagram 1
11 The Model 10 States ?
12 Design   Interaction Digram
13 Presentations   Class Diagram 2
14 Implementing Class    
15 Implementing Class    
16 Final & Projects Due   Finals Week
CourseCSC548CallNumber71906
TermFall 2016Section1
Time11:00-12:15DaysM W
Final2016-12-16At08:00

Description

CSC 548 is concerned with modern software design. Large projects require a coordinated effort from multiple programmers. To successfully complete a large scale project using an Obeject-Oriented programming language the student needs to understand the subjects in the following outline

Requirement Analysis

  • Actors
  • Use case

Static Model

  • Object
  • Class
  • Information hiding
  • Encapsulation
  • Inheritance
  • Polymorphism
  • Late binding
  • Method overriding

Dynamic Model

  • State
  • Transition
  • Event
  • Action
  • Activity
  • Mealy machine
  • Moore machine

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program large projects require cooperation and planning. Developing a software plan is one of the main goals of this class, as is the ability to coordinate and work with others.

Modern software is most often designed using an object oriented paradigm. We will delve into Object Oriented Design, OOD, its Java imlementation, and the use of the version cntrol system GIT.

Grades based on
One Test 20 %
Midterm 75-minute test 20 %
In class projects 20 %
Three-Four programming assignments 20 %
Final Project 20 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library.

Software Engineering: A Hands-On Approach

  • Author: Robert Y. Lee
  • ISBN-13 eBook: 978-94-6239-006-5

    Library of Congress Control Nu

O-O ADI

Mobile App Development

Week Subject Book Work Due
0 App    
1 XCode 1 Video
2 Swift 2 Die
3 Interaction 3 Quiz 1
4 More Interaction 4 App One
5 View 5 Quiz 2
6 Multi-View/Spinners 6 Temp
7 Review-MidTerm    
8 BREAK    
9 Tables   Proposal
10 Segue Video Storyboard
11 Navigation    
12 Utility    
13 Persistence    
14 Prototypes    
15 Touch    
CourseCSC581CallNumber72345
TermFall 2016Section1
Time11:00-12:15Days T H
Final2016-12-13At13:00

Description

This class covers the basics of iPhone App development.

Objectives

The purpose of programming is to make the computer do what you want it to. The goal of this course is to take the student over the hurdles of Swift and XCode so that they an build the App of their dreams.

Course Organization

The first half of the class will present the first seven chapters of the textbook in detail. This will include the basics of the Swift programming language and how the XCode IDE functions. The second half will focus on the Student's Apps and the technologies needed to achieve full functionality.

There will be a two Tests and a Midterm. It will cover the material from the previous week's lecture(s), the appropriate chapters of the book, and any lessons you should have learned while you were doing your projects. The final will be your iPhone App.

Assignments

Assignments will be collected at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Anything turned in after the assignment has been collected is considered late.

I do not believe in arriving late to class, finishing homework in class, printing materials after class, or handing it in "later" and receiving full credit. Late assignments will not receive full credit.

Grades based on
Three Quizzes 25 %
Five-six programming assignments 25 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 25 %
Final App 25 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

iOS

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library

Beginning iPhone Development with Swift 2

Beginning iPhone Development with Swift 2 Exploring the iOS 9 SDK

  • By David Mark , Jack Nutting , Kim Topley , Fredrik Olsson , Jeff LaMarche
  • ISBN13: 978-1-484217-53-5
  • 880 Pages
  • User Level: Beginner to Intermediate
  • Publication Date: December 23, 2015
  • Available eBook Formats: EPUB, MOBI, PDF

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
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