DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203A
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester
DC Nichole Jelinek
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Programs

  • Computer Science JM&C
  • Center for the Mathematics of Uncertainty CMU.
  • Research Design and Analysis RDA
  • North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society NAFIPS
  • Various Programs I have written are available by selecting the Programs Tab (On fuzzy.creighton.edu).

Downloads

 

 

Computer Programming II

Day Date Subject Book Homework Due
Thursday 1/10/2008 Introduction, overview.    
Tuesday 1/15/2008 Review    
Thursday 1/17/2008 Files    
Tuesday 1/22/2008 NetBeans-GUI   Prog1
Thursday 1/24/2008 InnerClasse & Events    
Tuesday 1/29/2008 Timers & Controls   P&J
Thursday 1/31/2008 Controls    
Tuesday 2/5/2008 OOD    
Thursday 2/7/2008 Tic-Tac-Toe    
Tuesday 2/12/2008 Inheritance    
Thursday 2/14/2008 Polymorphism    
Tuesday 2/19/2008 Array    
Thursday 2/21/2008 Arraylist Complex   Review Sheet
Tuesday 2/26/2008 Review    
Thursday 2/28/2008 MidTerm    
Tuesday 3/4/2008 SPRING    
Thursday 3/6/2008 BREAK    
Tuesday 3/11/2008 Recursion    
Thursday 3/13/2008 Recursion    
Tuesday 3/18/2008 TTT2    
Thursday 3/20/2008 Searching   Exercise P13.10 P.542
Tuesday 3/25/2008 Sorting    
Thursday 3/27/2008 Big-O    
Tuesday 4/1/2008 More Sorting    
Thursday 4/3/2008 Efficiency    
Tuesday 4/8/2008 Data Structures    
Thursday 4/10/2008 Lists   Prog4
Tuesday 4/15/2008 Queues    
Thursday 4/17/2008 Stacks    
Tuesday 4/22/2008 Review    
Thursday 4/24/2008 Review   Prog P15.2 page 607
Thursday 5/1/2008 Final 10:00-11:40  
CourseCSC222CallNumber12745
TermSpring 2008Section1
Time00:00-13:45Days T R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

This course, together with CSC 221, forms an introduction to problem-solving and programming. Building upon CSC 221, this course focuses on the design and analysis of larger, more complex programs. The process of breaking down a complex problem into manageable pieces and building a working system will be stressed throughout. Since part of this process is choosing the appropriate algorithm to solve the problem at hand, we will investigate the design and analysis of some standard and useful algorithms. Similarly, we will consider various ways of structuring and transforming information so as to make it efficiently accessible and manageable.

Specific topics covered in the course will include: GUI programming and data structures (e.g., vectors, pointers, classes), defining and using abstract data types (e.g., lists, stacks, queues), static vs. dynamic implementations of data structures, and recursion as an alternative to iteration. The structures and concepts covered in this class will be a starting point for further development in subsequent computer science courses.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To know and be able to use basic programming tools for object-oriented problem solving (e.g., classes, encapsulation, data hiding, and templates).
  • To appreciate the role of algorithms and data structures in problem solving and software design, recognizing that a given problem might be solved with a variety of algorithms and structures (e.g., object-oriented design, searching and sorting, recursion, stacks, queues, and linked lists).
  • To be able to design and implement a program to model a real-world system, and subsequently analyze its behavior.
  • To develop programming skills that can serve as a foundation for further study in computer science.

 

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be four quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Java program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be accepted up to 14 days after their due date, with a 1pt a day penalty for the first week, and a 2pt a day penalty for the second week.

Grades based on
Four quizzes 20 %
In class projects 10 %
Six programming assignments 30 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
One 100-minute final exam 20 %

 

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Objects First

JavaNotes, 7th edition

David J. Eck

Note the pdf download links at the bottom.

Local JavaNotes7

Sometimes you have to edit the latest setting list on the mac to make things work right. The file I edited was "/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_25.jdk/Contents/Info.plist" but you version may differ. The relevant section is


<key>JVMCapabilities</key>
<array>
<string>JNI</string>
<string>BundledApp</string>
<string>WebStart</string>
<string>Applets</string>
<string>CommandLine</string>
</array>

Fuzzy Set Theory

Day Date Subject Book Homework Due
Thursday 1/10/2008 Why Fuzzy Set    
Tuesday 1/15/2008 Sets A.1-5  
Thursday 1/17/2008 Logic A.7-A.8,A.10-A.11  
Tuesday 1/22/2008 Fuzzy Sets 1.1-1.3 A.1-A.26 Odd
Thursday 1/24/2008 Operators 1.4-1.5 A.31-A.34
Tuesday 1/29/2008 ISODATA 2.1-2.4 1.1-1.20 Odd
Thursday 1/31/2008 Clustering 2.5-2.6 1.23-1.31 Odd
Tuesday 2/5/2008 Fuzzy Number - Quiz1 3.1-3.2  
Thursday 2/7/2008 Fuzzy Arithmetic 3.3,3.5  
Tuesday 2/12/2008 T-Norms 4.1-4.5 3.1-3.8
Thursday 2/14/2008      
Tuesday 2/19/2008 Fuzzification 1 7.1-7.5 Data
Thursday 2/21/2008 Fuzzification 2 7.6-7.7 Ch4 2,5,8,11,14,21,
22,23,24,33,34,35,36
Tuesday 2/26/2008 Review    
Thursday 2/28/2008 MidTerm    
Tuesday 3/4/2008 SPRING    
Thursday 3/6/2008 BREAK    
Tuesday 3/11/2008 Relations 5.1-5.2 Uncertainty
Thursday 3/13/2008 Fuzzy Relations 5.3-5.4 Expected Utility
Tuesday 3/18/2008 Linguistics 6.1-6.3  
Thursday 3/20/2008 Fuzzy Logic 8.0-8.1  
Tuesday 3/25/2008 Approximate Reaoning 9.1-9,4  
Thursday 3/27/2008      
Tuesday 4/1/2008      
Thursday 4/3/2008      
Tuesday 4/8/2008 Quiz 2    
Thursday 4/10/2008      
Tuesday 4/15/2008      
Thursday 4/17/2008      
Tuesday 4/22/2008      
Thursday 4/24/2008      
Thursday 5/1/2008 Final is YOUR Presentations 8:00-9:40  
CourseHRS303CallNumber12982
TermSpring 2008Section1
Time14:00-15:15Days T R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

HRS 303 covers the basic foundations of fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. The emphasis of this class is the modeling of linguistic systems. The first half of the class will focus on the mathematics of fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. The second portion of the class will focus on a new area  of research at Creighton University; the use of fuzzy set theory in Political Science models


Organization

For the first half of the class there will be a homework assignment every week. They will serve as an example of the type of questions that will occur on the quizzes/midterm. The final is a five page paper explaining an application of fuzzy set theory in an area of interest to you (preferably from the social sciences). There will be 2 quizzes, a midterm, and a final paper/presentation. They will cover the material from the classes and the homework.

 

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER PERCENT
Midterm 1 20%
Final Presentation 1 10%
Quizes 2 10%
Paper 1 10%
Homework 10 50%

A 90-100%
B+ 85-90%
B 80-85%
C+ 75-80%
C 70-75%
D 60-70%

Class Cancellation Policy:

I will email you, the Secretary almost always knows what is going on. I may even update the website.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

TRIThe Textbook for The Honors Class

An Introduction to the Mathematics of Uncertainty by Mark J. Wierman. Publisher? 

Mark J. Wierman

Programs

Programs have Moved To:

Mathematics of Uncertainty

General

FAQ Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Expert Systems 1-1 [Monthly posting]

North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society (NAFIPS)

Evolutionary Computation at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Fuzzy Logic What is Fuzzy Logic

Other Uncertainty Theories

Camparison of uncertainty theories

Other Classes

CMP586

Robert Fuller

Fuzzy Set Software

XFuzzy spanish site, interesting XFL fuzzy language.

Jang's Neural-Fuzzy Links page.

Software Library for Operation Research

CMU Artificial Intelligence Repository

Internet Fuzzy Logic Repository

Fuzzy Logic Laboratorium Linz - Hagenberg

SINE from CMP586

Commercial Software

Fuzzy Systems Engineering

fuzzyTECH Home Page

FIDE - Fuzzy Inference Development Environment

Fuzzy Cluster Analysis Also Image Processing

Fuzzy Logic for Mathematica

Papers on the web

ResearchIndex formerly CiteSeer - a research tool where you can download many papers

Fuzzy Sets and Systems - a research tool where you can download many papers. Must register.

CITE a research tool where you can download many papers. Must register.

Using Fuzzy Logic for Molecular Modeling

Fuzzy Logic in Environmental Sciences A Bibliography

A Fuzzy Logic Approach to Detecting Severe Updrafts

Publications of Rudolf Kruse

Applications

Control

Inverted Pendulum Applet

Some C-Code from Passino

Inverted Pendulum Control Description

Inverted Pendulum 2

Image processing

Homepage Hamid R. Tizhoosh Literature

Image Classification

Selected Publications Kenneth H.L. Ho

Clustering

Fuzzy Cluster Analysis

The Case for Genetic Algorithms in Fuzzy Clustering

Neural Networks

Neural Networks: Reduction to Practice

Data Mining

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
2500 California Plaza | Omaha NE | 68178 | 402.280.1782
Copyright © 2015 Creighton University JM&C