DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203A
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester
DC Nichole Jelinek
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Programs

  • Computer Science JM&C
  • Center for the Mathematics of Uncertainty CMU.
  • Research Design and Analysis RDA
  • North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society NAFIPS
  • Various Programs I have written are available by selecting the Programs Tab (On fuzzy.creighton.edu).

Downloads

 

 

Computer Programming I

Date Topic Readings Assignment
15-Jan Course overview.    
20-Jan Computer basics, history. Ch. 1  
22-Jan Using objects. Ch. 2 In Class 1
27-Jan Implementing classes: Ch. 3  
29-Jan fields+constructors+methods, assignments. Ch. 4 QUIZ 1
3-Feb Simple conditionals and expressions: Ch. 4,6  ProgGuide
5-Feb if statements, mixed expressions, type casting. Ch. 4,6 P2.2
10-Feb Class design: Ch. 4,6  
12-Feb external method calls, class interaction. Ch. 4,6 Quiz 2
17-Feb Class design and strings:    
19-Feb design principles, objects vs. primitives.   Program P3.1 p125
24-Feb while loops Ch. 5  
26-Feb for loops Ch. 5 Quiz 3
3-Mar Review Ch. 4,6  
5-Mar Midterm Ch. 4,6  
10-Mar NO CLASS -- Fall Break    
12-Mar NO CLASS -- Fall Break    
17-Mar Arrays Ch. 7  
19-Mar ArrayLists Ch. 7  
24-Mar Arrays & Arraylists Ch. 8  
26-Mar Graphics Ch. 2/3 Program 3 Exercise P7.8
31-Mar Graphics Ch. 2/3  
2-Apr Graphics and design: Ch. ?  
7-Apr Array Review Ch. ?  
9-Apr Brushes & Random Ch. 9 Applet (Email link)
14-Apr Arcs...   Quizz 4 Arrays
16-Apr Netbeans/Bugs    
21-Apr String, Scanner, & File   Program4 Drawing
23-Apr HTML/Applet   Program5 Applett
28-Apr Course review    
30-Apr Course review    
7-May FINAL EXAM     Thursday, 10:00-11:40    
CourseCSC221CallNumber10187
TermSpring 2009Section1
Time12:30-13:45Days T R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

Course description:

This course provides an introduction to problem solving, computing, and programming using the language Python.

The process of programming is much more than just writing code. It involves analyzing the problem at hand, designing a solution, implementing and testing that solution, and critiquing results. The python language is designed to naturally introduce fundamental concepts of programming and make it possible to being solving nontrivial problems quickly.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To develop problem solving and programming skills to enable the student to design solutions to non-trivial problems and implement those solutions in Python.
  • To master the fundamental programming constructs of Python, including variables, expressions, functions, control structures, and lists.
  • To build a foundation for more advanced programming techniques, including object-oriented design and the use of standard data structures (as taught in CSC 222).

This course is intended as a first programming course, so no prior experience with computers is assumed. The problem-solving and programming techniques introduced in this course are further expanded in the follow-up course, CSC 222: Object-Oriented Programming.


Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be six quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Python program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be not recieve full credit.

Grades based on
Four quizzes 20 %
In class projects 10 %
Five-six programming assignments 30 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
One 100-minute final exam 20 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Zelle

PYTHON PROGRAMMING
John Zelle, 2nd Edition
Franklin, Beedle & Associates
ISBN 9781590282410

Source Code and Power Point Slides

Human Computer Interaction

Mon Wed HCI HomeWork Wed
  13-Jan Hello  
19-Jan 20-Jan User/Task Hate
26-Jan 27-Jan Design Project/User
2-Feb 4-Feb Psychology Hate2
9-Feb 11-Feb Color Art Work
16-Feb 18-Feb User Love
23-Feb 25-Feb Widgets Screen Shots
2-Mar 4-Mar Presentation Presentation
9-Mar 11-Mar BREAK  
16-Mar 18-Mar STM Love2
23-Mar 25-Mar Representation Icon
30-Mar 1-Apr UI & Menu TestPlan
6-Apr 9-Apr Hypermedia & Help Menu
13-Apr 16-Apr Comand Line & Form Help
20-Apr 22-Apr  Usability testing Integration
27-Apr 29-Apr   Screen Shots2
5-May   FinalPaper.PDF&Presentations Tuesday 10:00-11:40 AM
CourseCSC444CallNumber12920
TermSpring 2009Section1
Time15:30-16:45DaysM W
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

Software is designed to accomplish tasks. Discovering these tasks takes a great degree of skill. The investigator must understand principles of human behavior, physiological and psychological characteristics of human cognition, information systems, and interface design. Proper, ergonomic, design leads to faster information processing systems with a lower error rate, reduced training and support costs, and greater worker satisfaction.

Objectives

This class covers a broad spectrum of topics to provide a background in all of the areas necessary to understand Human Computer Interaction. These topics include: principles of design; methods for evaluating interfaces with or without user involvement; and techniques for prototyping and implementing graphical user interfaces.

Organization

There will be a quiz every Monday It will cover the material from the previous week's lecture(s), the appropriate chapters of the book, and any lessons you should have learned while you were doing your projects. You will have to do two presentations. The midterm and final are presentations.



Presentation Guidlines

Written Assignments

Pages

Hate

Write a two page description of a single application piece of software that you judge to have an inferior design. Explain precisely what aspects of the design you dislike and why you dislike them.

Explanation

Most people use software. Much of the software currently available fails to completely satisfy the user's expectations and needs. Computer scientists create software. It is important for the computer scientist to define precisely which aspects of software demonstrate the creator's lack of understanding of the user's perspective.

Two

Hate 2

Resubmit Hate after feedback.

Two

Project/User

Write a detailed description of the GUI you propose to design. Include a section that describes the user that makes up the target audience. Include a section  that lists the the users major tasks. Explain the hardare/operating system/form factor of the target system. For example PC/WinXP/VGA.

Explanation

To designing software for human use the software designer must understand the target audience and the tasks that need to be accomplished. Computer scientists create software. It is important for the computer scientist to define precisely which aspects of software demonstrate the creator's lack of understanding of the user's perspective. It is especially important to note the negative impact of poor software on productivity.

Three

Artwork

Using pens/crayons/markers/paint/gliter/… make a physical drawing of the interface for your project. Include all the major screens where interaction takes place.

1+

Love

Write a two page description of a single application piece of software that you judge to have a superior design. Explain precisely what aspects of the design you like and why you like them.

Explanation

Some of the software that we use exceeds our expectations and needs. Like a comfortable garment it is both attractive and useful. What is important in this assignment is explaining to other people what it is about this piece of software that makes it remarkable. Especially, explaining what about the software fits the user.

Two

Screenshots

Using a computer based drawing program produce a soft copy of the interface for your project. Include all the major screens where interaction takes place.

1+

Love 2

Resubmit Love after feedback.

Two

Icon

On a white sheet of paper draw, in color, the Icon that will represent your software product.

 

Vector Icon

Using Adobe Illustrator draw an Icon. Submit a zip file on blueline that contains AI and PNG versions of your design.

 

GUI

Write up the presenation of your GUI. Be sure to include screen shots and a complete description of what the GUI is designed to do and how the primary tasks are accomplished.

Explanation

Technical writing is a skill. In a presentation, questions from the audience can clear up difficulties in understanding what the GUI does and how it does it. A writer has a more difficult job, they clearly cover all the functionali of the GUI in a logical order. Clarity of expression is the ultimate gole of the tech-writer. The length should be about three pages.

 

Critique

Write up the qritique of your GUI from the first presentation. Be sure to include screen shots and consult the presentation guide for a list of possible discussion points. You can also draw upon the audience feedback gathered from your presentation. Remember to take everything with a grain of salt.

Explanation

Know thyself is easier said than done. To objectively analyze a personal design is a daunting task. The length should be about two pages.

Three

Menu/Commands

Using an HTML editor (Microsoft Word is one), make an outline of all the commands that activate your application. Each command should Link to a Section that explains what the command is supposed to accomplish in the setting of your software. The paragraph should link back to the list.

Explanation

Technical writing needs to be short but clear. Words are more difficult to read on a display screen and hence computer help needs to be precise. Most users are in the help system when under distress, this means that Help must be helpful. This is not as easy to achieve as it would seem. The length should be about three pages.

Two

Test Plan

Using the Task List from Project/User detail a test plan. Find a test subject and have them detail (using the screenshots) how they would accomplish the tasks using the software. Analyze results.

2

Help

Write the help pages for your GUI. The initial page should use the description from Project/User as well as a screen capture of the final version of your GUI. The following pages would be derived from Menu/Commands.

Remember these pages should be consistent graphically, etc., with your GUI.

3+-

Integration

Assemble the project report. This starts with the Project Proposal. Scan and add the Paper Copy. Add Version one screen shots. The next section should analyze this version using feedback from presentation one. Add Help as a description of functionality. Add a Test Plan and a Test Plan analysis. Add Final screen shots and a description of  changes made from previous versions.

10+

Screenshots 2

Using a computer based drawing program produce a soft copy of the interface for your project. Include all the major screens where interaction takes place.

1+

 

An "A" Paper

_____is a complete response to the assignment

_____is thoughtful and sophisticated

_____demonstrates a mastery of class concepts

_____is well organized

_____has carefully organized and constructed paragraphs that use concise sentences

_____is free of repetition

_____highlights important points

_____has few errors (none serious) in grammar, spelling, or punctuation

_____uses correct bibliographic and citation styles consistently

A "B" Paper

_____is a direct but not necessarily complete response to the assignment

_____is thoughtful

_____demonstrates an understanding of class concepts

_____is well organized

_____has carefully organized and constructed paragraphs

_____is free of repetition

_____highlights important points

_____has few serious errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation

_____uses correct bibliographic and citation styles consistently

A "C" Paper

_____is not a complete response to the assignment

_____is superficial

_____demonstrates some understanding of class concepts

_____is poorly organized

_____is repetitive

An "D" Paper

_____is an inadequate response to the assignment

_____is very superficial

_____demonstrates little understanding of class concepts

_____is badly organized

_____is repetitive

An "F" Paper

_____falls short of the standards of a "D" report

Assignments:

Assignments will be collected at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Anything turned in after the assignment has been collected is considered late.

I do not believe in arriving late to class, finishing homework in class, printing materials after class, or handing it in "later" and receiving full credit. Late assignments will be docked 25% each day the assignment is late. Thus if you turn in your paper later that day, it is still late. For example, if an assignment is worth 100 points and you turn it in late (2 days later) and receive an 84 on the assignment, a score of 42 will be recorded in the gradebook. Please pay special attention to these deadlines for the papers. Anything turned in after 4 days in which the assignment is due will receive a grade of zero.

Grading:

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Presentations      (2)     24%
Quizzes   (12)   36%
Homeworks    (10)     40%

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Optional

Strunk & White: A Manual Of Style

Wireless Security

CourseCSC590CallNumber13317
TermSpring 2009Section1
Time16:00-17:15Days R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

R is a computer language dedicaded to statistical computing and graphics. R is in wide use in the field of data analysis. Many packages are written for R to perform sophisticated procedures, such as the text mining. It is widely used by researchers in political science.

Objectives

Magis Core

From the beginning, mathematics has been a defining feature of a Jesuit education. Jeronimo Nadal, a trained mathematician, long ago established mathematics as having a place in the Jesuit curriculum. Much of the reason for this is that understanding mathematics, and understanding statistics, is key to understanding our complex world. This is particularly true of students studying computer sciences and informatics. Here students must learn how to use the quantitative, statistical tools that will be necessary in order for them to understand the problems facing an increasingly data-driven society, and to develop appropriate and effective solutions to these problems.

R is an open source language for statistics, visualization, and data manipulation. Currently the Tiobe Index places R as the 18th most popular computer language. This course teaches students how to understand the different type of data, such as ordinal and ratio, and the proper methods to analyze each type. In early class periods, students are introduced to basic descriptive statistics, and the correct presentation of data. They are subsequently introduced to statistical tests and their interpretation. Finally, regression and ANOVA are covered. The course also emphasizes the importance of visualization, and the understanding that statistical procedures are only as good as the data. Both the midterm and the finals are papers where students display their ability to perform statistical analysis and visualize and interpret the results.

Objective
Students will interpret and present quantitative information verbally, mathematically, statistically, and graphically.
Assesment
This will be aasssesed by the midterm, which will be archived.
Objective
Students will apply appropriate technology, quantitative tools and logical modes of thinking to analyze and synthesize information in problem solving situations.
Assesment
This will be aasssesed by the final, which will be archived.

Statistical

  • Explain basic types of computer processed data.
  • Understand the basics of a data oriented scripting language.
  • Use basic descriptive statistics to understand the data.
  • Visualize basic data types.
  • Performing a simple exploratory data analysis.
  • Understand some basic statistical distributions.
  • Test of hypotheses.
  • Understand when and how to use basic linear regression models.
  • Understand correlation and ANOVA methods to analyze data.
  • Synthesis

Organization

There will be a homework assignment every week. There will be a midterm and a final paper.

ASSIGNMENT NUMBER PERCENT
Midterm 1 20%
Final Presentation 1 10%
Quizes 2 10%
Paper 1 10%
Homework 10 50%

Class Cancellation Policy:

I will email you, the Admin almost always knows what is going on. I may even update the website.

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

×

Academic Honesty

  • We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.
  • The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Verzani

Using R for Introductory Statistics by John Verzani
Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC; 1 edition (November 29, 2004)
ISBN-13: 978-1584884507

R

Godel, Escher and Bach

  DATE Subject Chapter Homework Due
Thu Jan-15  Organization Of Teams    
Tue Jan-20 INTRODUCTION Intro  
Thu Jan-22 THE MU-PUZZLE  I Strange Loop
Tue Jan-27 Team 0  &  Team 1    
Thu Jan-29 MEANING AND FORM IN MATHEMATICS  II MUI
Tue Feb-3 Team 2    
Thu Feb-5 FIGURE AND GROUND  III PQ
Tue Feb-10 Team 3    
Thu Feb-12 CONSISTENCY, COMPLETENESS, AND GEOMETRY  IV TQ
Tue Feb-17 Team 4    
Thu Feb-19 RECURSIVE STRUCTURES AND PROCESSES  V  Geometry
Tue Feb-24 Team 5    
Thu Feb-26 THE LOCATION OF MEANING  VI  Recursion
Tue Mar-3 Team 6    
Thu Mar-5 No Class - Public Choice  VII Biology
Tue Mar-10 SPRING    
Thu Mar-12 BREAK    
Tue Mar-17 Team 7    
Thu Mar-19  THE PROPOSITIONAL CALCULUS  VIII  Calculus
Tue Mar-24 Team 8    
Thu Mar-26 TYPOGRAPHICAL NUMBER THEORY  IX  Numbers
Tue Mar-31 Team 9    
Thu Apr-2 MUMON AND GODEL  X  Zen
Tue Apr-7 Team 10    
Thu Apr-9 LEVELS OF DESCRIPTION, AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS  XI Granularity
Tue Apr-14 Team 11    
Thu Apr-16 Thoughts XII Consciousness
Tue Apr-21 Team 12    
Thu Apr-23 BlooP and FlooP and GlooP XIII  Turing 
Tue Apr-28 ON FORMALLY UNDECIDABLE PROPOSITIONS XIV  
Thu Apr-30 IN TYPOGRAPHICAL NUMBER THEORY    
Thu May-7 10 Page Papers are due. 8-9:40  
CourseHRS312CallNumber12926
TermSpring 2009Section1
Time14:00-15:15Days T R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

Paradox is actually a very good thing. Zeno's paradox, the Liars paradox, and even the Prisoners dilemma are all examples of problems that seem insurmountable. However the solution of these problems creates the greatest discoveries in the history of science and mathematics. A paradox is really a message that our assumptions are leading us to jump to unwarranted conclusions. This course uses the Pulitzer Prize winning book as a guide to an the exploration of human creativity and problem solving ability.

Organization

The class will cover about chapter a week.

Monday the instructor will try to clarify the formal systems presented in the textbook.

On Wednesday the students will discuss what they have garnered from the current Chapter Dialogue.
There will be a homework assignment every week.  The final is a presentation/ten page paper (double space) expanding on one of the many areas that we will try to reflect upon. There will be 2 quizzes given at random. They will cover the material from the classes and the homework. 

Assignments: Home Work 2009

Final paper rubric: GEB Rubrick

Assignments will be collected at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Anything turned in after the assignment has been collected is considered late.

I do not believe in arriving late to class, finishing homework in class, printing materials after class, or handing it in "later" and receiving full credit. Late assignments will be docked 5% each day the assignment is late. Thus if you turn in your paper later that day, it is still late. For example, if an assignment is worth 100 points and you turn it in late (2 days later) and receive an 84 on the assignment, a score of 74 will be recorded in the grade book. Please pay special attention to these deadlines for the papers. Anything turned in after 4 days in which the assignment is due will receive a grade of zero.

Grading:

Grading System  
Team Presentation 20%
Final Project 22%
Participation 10%
Attendence 10%
Homework (12) 38%

 

Grades
A = 90-100%
B+ = 85-90%
B = 80-85%
C+ = 75-80%
C = 70-75%
D = 60-70%

Academic Honesty

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Textbook
Godel, Escher, Bach -
An Eternal Golden Braid
Hofstadter, Douglas R.

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
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