DUCK

TERM

CLASS

Mark J. Wierman

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
11:00 Office
Hours
11:00 -12:15
HCCA203A
x1782
Software
Engineering
CSC548-1
13015
11:00-12:15
HCCA207

11:00 -12:15
Software
Engineering
CSC548-1
13015
11:00-12:15
HCCA207
 
 
 
12:00
         
    Office
Hours
12:30 -13:45
HCCA203A
x1782
  Office
Hours
12:30 -13:45
HCCA203A
x1782
     
13:00    
     
  Introduction
to
Programming
CSC221-1
12717
13:30-15:20
HCCA204
Introduction
to
Programming
CSC221-1
12717
13:30-15:20
HCCA204
     
14:00 Web Prog
CSC548-1
13016
14:00-15:15
HCCA207
Web Prog
CSC548-1
13016
14:00-15:15
HCCA207
 
 
 
15:00
         
         
         
Name Mark J. Wierman
Office CA203B
School Creighton University
Address Omaha, NE 68178-2090
email mwierman@creighton.edu
Phone (402) 280-1782
Fax (402) 280-1494
Semester Spring 2013
DC Sandra Drummond
DC Phone 402-280-2825

Recent Publications

Books

  1. Michael B. Gibilisco, Annie M. Gowen, Karen E. Albert, John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, and Alex Pham. Fuzzy Social Choice Theory. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
  2. John N. Mordeson, Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, Alex Pham, and Michael A. Redmond. Linear Models in the Mathematics of Uncertainty. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

 

Chapters

  1. Eric N. Fischer, Ciprianna M. Dudding, Tyler J. Engel, Matthew A. Reynolds, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Explaining variation in state involvement in cyber attacks: A social network approach. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 63—74. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  2. Morgan L. Eichman, James A. Rolfsen, Mark J. Wierman, John N. Morde- son, and Terry D. Clark. The global spread of islamism: An agent-based computer model. In Witold Pedrycz and Shyi-Ming Chen, editors, Social Networks: A Framework of Computational Intelligence, pages 407—426. Springer, Berlin, 2013.
  3. Mark J. Wierman. Syzygy. In Rudolf Seising, Enric Trillas, Claudio Moraga, and Settimo Termini, editors, On Fuzziness: A Homage to Lotfi A. Zadeh, volume 2, pages 327—334. Springer, Berlin, 2013.

Journal Articles

  1. Peter Colum Casey, Mark J. Wierman, Michael B. Gibilisco, John N. Mordeson, and Terry D. Clark. Assessing policy stability in iraq: a fuzzy approach to modeling preferences. Public Choice, 151:409-423, 2012.
  2. William J. Tastle, J. Russell, and Mark J. Wierman. A new measure to analyze student performance using the likert scale. Information Systems Education Journal, 6(35), 2008.
  3. Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, Adam Karnik, Jacob Moore, and Mark J. Wierman. Determining the causes of democratic consolidation: A consideration of several fuzzy methods. New Mathematics and Natural Computation, 5:353—369, 2009.

Conference Papers

  1. Mark J. Wierman. Psychologists: Are they logically fuzzy? In IFSA/NAFIPS, 2013, pages 854—859, June 2013.
  2. Mark J. Wierman, Terry D. Clark, John N. Mordeson, and William .J. Tastle. A critique of fuzzy rational choice models. In NAFIPS, 2012, pages 1-6, August 2012.
  3. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Multidimensional dissention. In NAFIPS 2011, pages 117-122. El Paso, TX, 2011. ISBN 978-1-61284-967-6.
  4. Mark J. Wierman. Cloud sets as a measure theoretic basis for fuzzy set theory. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.
  5. Mark J. Wierman and William J. Tastle. Measurement theory and subsethood. In NAFIPS 2010. Toronto, CA, 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7858-3.

 

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Introduction to Programming

Week Subject Tue: Thu:
Jan 16, 2013 Computers and Programs    
Jan 21, 2013 Writing Simple Programs   PE 1.3-5
Jan 28, 2013 Computing with Numbers    
Feb 04, 2013 Objects and Graphics   PE 3.1,3.3,3.7
Feb 11, 2013 Sequences: Strings, Lists, and Files    
Feb 18, 2013 Defining Functions    
Feb 25, 2013 Decision Structures Lab PE5.2&5.3 HW PE5.12&5.13
Mar 04, 2013 Midterm Review Midterm
Mar 11, 2013 Spring Break    
Mar 18, 2013 Loop Structures and Booleans    
Mar 25, 2013 Simulation and Design    
Apr 01, 2013 Defining Classes    
Apr 08, 2013 Data Collections    
Apr 15, 2013 Object-Oriented Design    
Apr 22, 2013 Algorithm Design and Recursion    
Apr 29, 2013 Review    
CourseCSC221CallNumber12717
TermSpring 2013Section1
Time12:30-14:50DaysM W
Final2012-05-02At08:00

Description

Course description:

This course provides an introduction to problem solving, computing, and programming using the language Python.

The process of programming is much more than just writing code. It involves analyzing the problem at hand, designing a solution, implementing and testing that solution, and critiquing results. The python language is designed to naturally introduce fundamental concepts of programming and make it possible to being solving nontrivial problems quickly.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • To develop problem solving and programming skills to enable the student to design solutions to non-trivial problems and implement those solutions in Python.
  • To master the fundamental programming constructs of Python, including variables, expressions, functions, control structures, and lists.
  • To build a foundation for more advanced programming techniques, including object-oriented design and the use of standard data structures (as taught in CSC 222).

This course is intended as a first programming course, so no prior experience with computers is assumed. The problem-solving and programming techniques introduced in this course are further expanded in the follow-up course, CSC 222: Object-Oriented Programming.


Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be six quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Python program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be not recieve full credit.

Grades based on
Four quizzes 20 %
In class projects 10 %
Five-six programming assignments 30 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
One 100-minute final exam 20 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Zelle

PYTHON PROGRAMMING
John Zelle, 2nd Edition
Franklin, Beedle & Associates
ISBN 9781590282410

Source Code and Power Point Slides

Software Engineering

WEEK OF MATERIAL BOOK HOMEWORK
Jan 17, 2013 Introduction    
Jan 24, 2013 Java    
Jan 31, 2013 Finding Objects   Quiz 1 (Java)
Feb 07, 2013 Classes   Requirements 1
Feb 14, 2013 GAs   Use case
Feb 21, 2013 Identifying Responsibilities   Class Diagram 1
Feb 28, 2013 Specifying Static Behavior   Class Digram 2&3
Mar 07, 2013 Dynamic Behavior    
Mar 14, 2013 FALL BREAK   FALL BREAK
Mar 21, 2013 Identifying Relationships    
Mar 28, 2013 Rules    
Apr 04, 2013 The Model    
Apr 11, 2013 Design    
Apr 18, 2013 Presentations    
Apr 25, 2013 Implementing Class    
May 02, 2013 Implementing Class    
May 09, 2013 Final & Projects Due   Finals Week
CourseCSC548CallNumber13015
TermSpring 2013Section1
Time11:00-12:15DaysM W
Final2013-05-01At11:11

Description

CSC 548 is concerned with modern software design. Large projects require a coordinated effort from multiple programmers. To successfully complete a large scale project using an Obeject-Oriented programming language the student needs to understand the subjects in the following outline

Requirement Analysis

  • Actors
  • Use case

Static Model

  • Object
  • Class
  • Information hiding
  • Encapsulation
  • Inheritance
  • Polymorphism
  • Late binding
  • Method overriding

Dynamic Model

  • State
  • Transition
  • Event
  • Action
  • Activity
  • Mealy machine
  • Moore machine

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program large projects require cooperation and planning. Developing a software plan is one of the main goals of this class, as is the ability to coordinate and work with others.

Modern software is most often designed using an object oriented paradigm. We will delve into Object Oriented Design, OOD, its Java imlementation, and the use of the version cntrol system GIT.

Grades based on
One Test 20 %
Midterm 75-minute test 20 %
In class projects 20 %
Three-Four programming assignments 20 %
Final Project 20 %

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library.

Software Engineering: A Hands-On Approach

  • Author: Robert Y. Lee
  • ISBN-13 eBook: 978-94-6239-006-5

    Library of Congress Control Nu

O-O ADI

Web Programming

 
WD Date Subject Book Homework
Thu Jan 17, 2013 Introduction    
Tue Jan 22, 2013 HTML    
Thu Jan 24, 2013 CSS Ch. 1 mjw53172
Tue Jan 29, 2013 Java Ch. 2  
Thu Jan 31, 2013 Script Ch. 3  
Tue Feb 05, 2013 LAMP Ch. 4  
Thu Feb 07, 2013 PHP - Basics    
Tue Feb 12, 2013 PHP - Basics 2 Ch. 5 Quiz One
Thu Feb 14, 2013 PHP - CSS   e-penguin
Tue Feb 19, 2013 PHP - Includes Ch. 6
Thu Feb 21, 2013 PHP - $_POST   WorkSheet 1
Tue Feb 26, 2013 PHP -Forms Ch. 7
Thu Feb 28, 2013 PHP - Uploading    
Tue Mar 05, 2013 PHP - Files Ch. 8  
Thu Mar 07, 2013 Midterm    
Tue Mar 12, 2013 SPRING    
Thu Mar 14, 2013 BREAK    
Tue Mar 19, 2013 Python   Split
Thu Mar 21, 2013 PHP   Explode
Tue Mar 26, 2013 Database   SQL
Thu Mar 28, 2013 MySQL Ch. 8 C1 I2 J3
Tue Apr 02, 2013 Logins    
Thu Apr 04, 2013 Cookies    
Tue Apr 09, 2013 Sessions Ch. 12  
Thu Apr 11, 2013 Logins Ch 17 Login
Tue Apr 16, 2013 Logins    
Thu Apr 18, 2013 Javascript    
Tue Apr 23, 2013 Ajax Ch. 13  
Thu Apr 25, 2013 Test 3    
Tue Apr 30, 2013 Bugs Ch. 14  
Thu May 02, 2013 Security Ch 15  
Tue May 07, 2013 FINAL PROJECT Due

10:00AM

BLOG
CourseCSC551CallNumber13016
TermSpring 2013Section1
Time12:30-13:45Days T R
Final0000-00-00At00:00

Description

In the beginning there was the WorldWideWeb a browser written by Tim Berners-Lee (1990).  It allowed people to exchange documents and information over the internet using a markup language called HTML.

To say that this has changed the world is simply a statement of fact. But as soon as you invent something, people will say, "If only it could ..."

To make the WWW do more, needed the addition of code to HTML.

So this class will look at HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and SQL.

These languages will be studied on a  system called LAMP. LAMP is
Linux
Apache
mySQL, &
PHP

This course will focus on the last element but will introduce and use the other technologies to illustrate the orchestration of a modern interactive website.

Course Organization:

Required Work

Learning to program requires a consistent time commitment, as each new concept and programming technique builds on those that came before. There will be six quizzes and six programs. There will also be one midterm and one final. To allow for unavoidable absences, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Periodically, there will be in-class exercises that will be collected and graded.

To demonstrate problem solving and programming skills, students will complete 5-6 programs throughout the semester. Each assignment will involve the design and implementation of a Java program, and may also include a written component in which the behavior of the program is analyzed. Late assignments will be accepted up to 14 days after their due date, with a 1pt a day penalty for the first week, and a 2pt a day penalty for the second week.

Grades based on %
Four quizzes 20 %
Five-six programming assignments 50 %
Midterm 75-minute tests 20 %
Final Project 10 %

 

Grading
A 92-100%
B+ 87-91%
B 82-86%
C+ 77-81%
C 71-76%
D 60-70%
F 0-59%

Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

Regular attendance is expected of all students. If you must miss class for a legitimate reason, it is your responsibility to make up missed work. Quizzes and assignments will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances.

Academic Honesty

We are all expected to uphold all the standards and ethics of Creighton University.

The policy on academic honesty is set forth in the University bulletin.

Cheating

In particular, students caught cheating on a homework, program, quiz, or test will (at the minimum) be given a zero for that exam and will be referred to the Dean and/or Student Services for counseling and further disciplinary action. At the instructors discretion any student may be assigned an F as their class grade for any violation of the academic honesty policy of Creighton University.

Collaboration

  • Unless otherwise noted, all quizzes and tests are closed book, with no collaboration between students allowed.
  • Programming assignments allow only limited collaboration. You may ask for debugging help from your peers, but at no time should another student assist in the design or coding of your program. The design and implementation of your program should be entirely your own work!
  • Working together on homework assignments can be a positive experience and is not prohibited as long as the work you turn in is your best attempt at the assigned problem (i.e., no copying someone else's answers and turning it in as your own).

Violations of the above collaboration will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including a zero or negative grade, immediate failure of the course, and expulsion from the university. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

You should be able to download this for free from the Creighton Library.

PHP Solutions
3rd Edition

  • David Power
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 3 edition (December 5, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1484206363
UML

Penguin is 147.134.125.88

MS Software for JM&C People

PHP main website contains a PHP Manual

Database http://www.industrex.com/dynamic/database/

Lots of help, tutorials and manual on all things W3: http://www.w3schools.com/default.asp

MySQL/MariaSQL connection code

  • Python download platform independant source and install on command line using python3 setup.py install.
  • Java you have to add the jar to the build path

Mac

PC

 

JM&C

Mark J. Wierman | mwierman@creighton.edu
Journalism Media & Computing | Creighton University
2500 California Plaza | Omaha NE | 68178 | 402.280.1782
Copyright © 2015 Creighton University JM&C